Coronavirus Disease: Vaccine and Treatment Important Update

by Ren Chats
(Roskilde, Denmark)

The news headlines make people believe that the vaccine is discovered, which is far from the truth. There are many slips between a cup edge and lips.

Australian scientists believe that they have successfully mapped how Coronavirus affects us and how the fighter cells of our body resist its progression.

This discovery is undoubtedly a big step towards vaccine production against the virus, but only if it is flawless. First. it has to pass several processes to come in the form of a vaccine, and then a battery of trials before it can be used to protect people from Coronavirus infection. Without any slips, The whole process would take a minimum of 10 months.

This has, however, thrown light on, unlike Flu, why Coronavirus disease becomes uncontrollable in some; what is it that holds back their immune system to fight the virus invasion!

Research shows that the enzyme that helps the virus to bind with the cells is significantly high in people suffering from diabetes, high blood pressure, and heart diseases. More than the diseases themselves, it is some of the medications these cases receive upregulate angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), the enzyme that helps the virus to get the foothold.

These patients should approach their doctor to discuss if the treatment could be changed as a precaution, considering the possibility of flaring up of coronavirus infection.

Say No to Ibuprofen, Use Paracetamol

Through the same pathway, as noted above, anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen and cortisone could also aggravate COVID-19. The stress here is on Ibuprofen, which is often used to reduce fever and pain. It is the commonest self-medication available over the counter in the names of Brufen, Ibugesic, I-Profen, Nurofen, Advil, and Medix.

WHO has, therefore, declared that people who have COVID-19 symptoms should not take ibuprofen. WHO spokesperson Christian Lindmeier told the press that in Geneva, the United Nations' health experts were looking into this, and further guidance on the subject would soon follow. In the meantime, WHO recommends using paracetamol, and do not use ibuprofen as self-medication.

References:

1. Are patients with hypertension and diabetes mellitus at increased risk for COVID-19 infection? Lei Fang, George Karakiulakis, Michael Roth; Published:March 11, 2020 DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/S2213-2600(20)30116-8

2. Coronavirus: Australian scientists map how immune system fights virus

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